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HEIR LINE'S STORIES IN THE NEWS

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With her fourth manuscript complete, next on Caroline's publishing agenda is a series of titles about life in England from the Georgian era until the Second World War.


On the fiction side, Caroline is currently busy helping to edit Michael’s first historical novel - a story that the pair of them are very excited and enthusiastic about.


Click here to read some recent newspaper articles and book reviews, or browse through our archived features and reviews from 2013/14 and 2011/12!

ABOUT CAROLINE

MORE BOOKS!

Who invented the flying machine?  Was the Titanic really the first 'unsinkable' ship?  How would one use a phonoscope?


Using old Victorian documents, Caroline Rochford takes the reader on a guided tour of hundreds of fascinating 19th century inventions from across the globe, some strange and some remarkably familiar.  Think solar power is a modern concept?  Think again!  Today everyone has a camera, but imagine the excitement of taking a snap of a giraffe hotel!  This is a surprising journey, taking the reader on a trip from the clouds to the bottom of the ocean, with stops everywhere in between.

TITLE:

Great Victorian Inventions: Novel Contrivances and Industrial Revolutions


BY:

Caroline Rochford, Heir Line’s published author and genealogist


PUBLISHER:

Amberley


DATE OF PUBLICATION:

9th July 2014


PAGES:

288 (paperback)


WHERE TO BUY:

Amazon (Worldwide)

Waterstones

WHSmith

Blackwell’s

The Guardian Bookshop

Foyles

Booktopia

...and many more local & international stores!


CAROLINE'S FAVOURITE INVENTION:

The hand grenade fire extinguisher has to be one of the best worst inventions of recent times!  These little domestic devices were filled with a flame-dousing liquid, and were readily thrown into the heart of a house fire to extinguish the flames... before it was discovered that the liquid was actually a toxic chemical, particularly deadly when exposed to heat.  Mr. Dollond’s spectacles for horses (and the accompanying photograph) are really quite something, too!


___



Caroline began working on this, her first illustrated history book, in February 2012.  She was inspired by the discovery of a collection of rare Victorian magazines which offered the contemporary reader an insight into the latest cutting-edge inventions of the day, from all around the world.  


Caroline began transcribing the magazines during a long, crowded car journey to the highlands of Scotland, where she and her family were going on holiday.  Setting off from Yorkshire during the early hours of the morning, crammed into the backseat of the car, surrounded by bodies, suitcases, and a big hairy dog, Caroline precariously balanced her iPad and the old magazines on her lap, and by torchlight began writing her first book.

TITLE:

Great Victorian Discoveries: Astounding Revelations and Misguided Assumptions


BY:

Caroline Rochford


PUBLISHER:

Amberley


DATE OF PUBLICATION:

15th April 2015


PAGES:

288 (paperback)


WHERE TO BUY:

Amazon (Worldwide)

Waterstones

WHSmith

Blackwell’s

The Guardian Bookshop

Foyles

Booktopia

...and many more local & international stores!


CAROLINE'S FAVOURITE DISCOVERY:

There are so many, from every field of science, that it’s hard to choose a favourite.  There are some really fascinating “I never knew that!” types of discoveries, such as the dormant “compass bone” inside the human nose, granting our ancestors the ability to navigate vast distances; and really ridiculous ones that make you chuckle, like the tree that could electrocute people.  That’s what I call a power plant!!

Have you ever heard of a four-footed bird? Can you really teach a dog to read? Where would you find a kangaroo crossed with a lion?


In this brilliant and bizarre follow up to Great Victorian Inventions, Caroline Rochford reveals the wondrous experiments and bizarre theories of the great minds of science, engineering and natural history of the Victorian age.


Some discoveries were authentic, some merely misguided assumptions giving rise to strange beliefs. This book exposes the strange belief that Martians were constructing waterways on Mars and that the sun was really blue. It enters the world of botany with the discovery of a plant that had the ability to uproot itself and 'travel' across the landscape, along with an ornamental tree that 'ate' iron nails. Within these pages you can relive the moment when a German medical student accidentally splashed a liquid chemical in to his face and found it turned his eye numb, thus discovering local anaesthetic, and learn how green Victorians tackled the threat to fossil fuels by converting straw into energy.


Come on a remarkable journey into the past and see for yourself the extraordinary discoveries that promised to change the world forever.

“Charming and revelatory.”

- The Independent on Sunday.


“Accompanied by contemporary illustrations, this well-organised volume offers a fascinating insight into an extraordinary innovative age.”

- The Good Book Guide, October 2014.


“What the Victorians did for us was astounding.”

- The Yorkshire Evening Post.


“Remarkable black-and-white images have been compiled into a book.”

- The Daily Mail.


"There are so many brilliant inventions in this book, it simply confirms the belief that there was little or nothing for which the Victorians could not find a solution. Some of the inventions are hilarious, and the accompanying illustrations will inevitably have you chuckling. Some are more serious, of course, but the entire book is a wonderful read from start to finish. One of Amberley's best titles to date!"

- Books Monthly


“An eclectic mix of 19th-century designs ranging from the slightly bizarre to the downright brilliant.  This hugely entertaining selection covers everything from pioneering electrical devices to agricultural machinery and early designs for flying machines.  An amusing read - but it also contains many interesting slices of social history and insights into the Victorian world view.  Read it for: An entertaining anthology of Victorian inventions.”

- Your Family Tree Magazine, November 2014.

"In the follow-up to her hugely successful Great Victorian Inventions CAROLINE ROCHFORD’S new book reveals the wondrous discoveries and bizarre theories put forward by the great minds of the Victorian age."

- The Daily Express


"Weird and wonderful Victorian discoveries. It was an age of experimentation and innovation, and of great advances in the steamship, railway and the electric telegraph. But the Victorian period also saw a number of more unusual discoveries.  In her new book, Great Victorian Discoveries: Astounding Revelations and Misguided Assumptions, Caroline Rochford examines some of the incredible findings made across the world between 1875 and 1895."

- BBC History Extra Magazine


"This sequel to the author’s well-received Great Victorian Inventions presents a cornucopia of ‘brilliant and bizarre’ examples of Victorian quests for knowledge of a world, which they dominated in so many other spheres. Readers across a wide age spectrum will be entertained and surprised by many of its contents with so many excursions into areas unexplored by many other surveys of Victorian culture."

- Historical Association





~~ ANCESTRY BY HEIR LINE LTD ~~

Non-Fiction History Books by Our Family Historian

Contact Heir Line

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Caroline Rochford is a member of the Society of Authors

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Stirring tales of heroism at sea have been engrained in the annals of maritime history since time immemorial. Christopher Columbus' discovery of the New World, Queen Elizabeth I's defeat of the Spanish Armada, and Horatio Nelson's victory at Trafalgar are just some of Britain's most memorable naval triumphs. But what about the lesser-known tales from our seafaring past? The Victorian who invented a swimming machine in order to cross the English Channel; the capture of a 'real-life' mermaid; the lost pirate treasure of Alborán; the ghost of a murdered sailor who still haunts the streets of Portsmouth, and the daring explorers who vanished into the blue yonder, leaving behind nothing but a cryptic message in a champagne bottle. These are just some of our quirky naval stories that have been chronicled in verse and archived in newspaper clippings, and then forgotten with the passage of time. Historian and genealogist, Caroline Rochford, has packed 200 traditional songs and stories into this book, which offers an exciting, entertaining and eye-opening glimpse into our long lost maritime past.

TITLE:

Forgotten Songs and Stories of the Sea: A Treasury of Voices from our Maritime Past


BY:

Caroline Rochford


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Caroline Rochford is a Yorkshire-born author, having written Great Victorian Inventions (2014), Great Victorian Discoveries (2015) and In a Guardsman's Boots (2016). She and her historian husband, Michael J. Rochford, are directors of the genealogy company Heir Line Ltd (www.heir-line.co.uk), researching family trees for clients from all over the world and writing about the incredible discoveries they unearth. Caroline has always had an interest in naval history, being descended from a long line of merchant sea captains. As a child she was regaled with stories of her ancestors' many adventures on the ocean waves; and after discovering a collection of maritime poems in an antique shop, she was inspired to write a book about long forgotten songs and stories of the sea.


***


"Descending from a long line of merchant sea captains, historian and genealogist Caroline Rochford has always had an interest in the sea. Here in this very entertaining book, she has compiled some 200 traditional songs and stories. Through these verses, poems and fascinating tales the reader is taken back to a bygone age, when voyagers explored the high seas and their loved ones were left begind to wonder if they’d ever see their brave sailor men and women again. Amongst the tales are; the Victorian who invented a swimming machine in order to cross the English Channel; the capture of a ‘real-life’ mermaid; the lost pirate treasure of Alboran; the ghost of a murdered sailor who still haunts the streets of Portsmouth; and the daring explorers who vanished into the blue yonder, leaving behind nothing but a cryptic message in a champagne bottle. An exciting, entertaining and eye-opening glimpse into our long lost maritime past."


- Sea Breezes magazine, which declared Forgotten Songs and Stories of the Sea to be their "book of the month", March 2017

PUBLISHER:

Pen and Sword's history imprint


DATE OF PUBLICATION:

November 2016


FORMAT:

Paperback, with integrated black and white illustrations from the 19th century


PAGES:

252


COLOUR:

Black and white


RRP:

£14.99

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TITLE:

In a Guardsman's Boots:

A Boy Soldier's Adventures

from the Streets of 1920s Dublin to Buckingham Palace, WWII and the

Egyptian Revolution


BY:

Caroline Rochford and RSM Paddy Rochford


When he was just eight years old, Paddy Rochford enrolled at Dublin's Royal Hibernian Military School, where he was taught how to be a soldier with the British Army, like his father. Soon afterwards, in 1922, he and his fellow pupils were evacuated from Ireland, a land torn apart by civil war.


Across the sea in England, Paddy joined the Third Battalion of the Coldstream Guards as a drummer boy, with postings to Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace, the Bank of England and the Tower of London, where he guarded the royal family and Britain's treasures.


In the 1930s, as thousands of Jewish families fled Nazi Germany, Paddy was sent to Jerusalem, charged with keeping the peace between the local Arabs and the Jewish immigrants.


During the Second World War, he was part of the Western Desert Campaign in Egypt, defending British territories. After countless wartime adventures, the young sergeant went on to train the Egyptian Army, where a bond of friendship grew between him and the future president, Colonel Nasser. Learning Nasser's plans to oust the British from Egypt, Paddy tried in vain to warn his superiors prior to the bloody revolution of 1952, which signalled the end of British supremacy in the Middle East.


Paddy retired from the army soon afterwards, moving his young family to Yorkshire, where he began writing these, his enthralling memoirs about a young boy who spent a lifetime growing into his boots.



***


Following his retirement from the British Army, Paddy Rochford began chronicling his fascinating life stories, which began in a provincial Irish village on the outskirts of Dublin in the early twentieth century. As a boy soldier, evacuated from his native land, he travelled from Ireland to England and onwards to the trouble-torn Middle East, facing danger wherever he went. In a bid to finally escape the horrors of war, he began putting pen to paper, but he passed away before he had completed his manuscript.


Caroline Rochford, the wife of Paddy's grandson, is a Yorkshire-born author, having written Great Victorian Inventions (2014) and Great Victorian Discoveries (2015), both published by Amberley. She and her historian husband, Michael J. Rochford, are directors of the genealogy company Heir Line Ltd, and both were fascinated to receive Paddy's long forgotten papers in 2010. Caroline spent the next five years researching his career, editing his notes and piecing his incredible story together.

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PUBLISHER:

Pen and Sword's military imprint


DATE OF PUBLICATION:

30th April 2016


FORMAT:

Hardback, 234mm x 156mm, with black and white photographs


RRP:

£25

WHERE TO BUY:

Amazon (Worldwide)

Waterstones

WHSmith

Blackwell’s

The Guardian Bookshop

Foyles

Booktopia

...and many more local & international stores!

Highlights of the story:


•     First-hand memories, beginning with an impoverished Irish childhood shaped by the social and political turmoil of the 1910s


•     The training of boy soldiers for the British armed forces in Ireland, and their evacuation to England following the formation of the Irish Free State


•     Pre-war service in the Middle East, keeping the peace between the feuding Jews and Arabs


•     The discovery of ancient parchments and having to leave them behind, only for them to be rediscovered thirty years later and dubbed the Dead Sea Scrolls


•     WWII action in the Western Desert defending the Egyptian frontiers from the Axis forces


•     Gaining access, as an Irishman, to the inner social circles of high-ranking Egyptian officials at a time when the English were distrusted


•     Training the Egyptian Army before the bloody revolution of 1952 that ousted the British


•     Using a lifetime of military experience in retirement for the good of the local community